Water in Scripture: Part 3

WATER IN THE OLD TESTAMENT Crossing the Red Sea and later passages of water We have already referred briefly to the crossing of the Red Sea by the children of Israel at the beginning of their Exodus from Egypt.  The relevant sequence of events in the book of Exodus, with the Red Sea at the…

Water in Scripture: Part 2

WATER IN THE OLD TESTAMENT The waters of creation and chaos, Genesis 1-11 The Near East seems to have known several creation myths, including the Babylonian Enuma Elish, which featured the taming or controlling or destruction of a water dragon or serpent who represents primeval chaos.  There may be echoes of these myths in mentions…

Water in Scripture: Part 1

WATER IN SCRIPTURE INTRODUCTION Usually my Bible studies have been studies of complete individual books of the Old or New Testament, in which we work through the book from beginning to end.  On occasion, however, it is useful to pursue a topical study, which considers a subject through Scripture as a whole or at any…

Cranmer and Anglicanism

In a recent listing of ‘My Favorite Anglican Theologians’, several respondents mentioned Thomas Cranmer.  While I cannot say I was surprised, I had, as always when people speak about Cranmer, questions.  What do these people mean by ‘Cranmer’?  In particular, Which Cranmer do they mean? Often, I suspect, what is really meant is not Cranmer’s…

John-Charles Vockler

Another chapter in my 'Friends and Parishioners' series.  The Most Reverend Brother John-Charles Vockler, FODC, was consecrated as a bishop in Australia in 1959 (Anglican Church of Australia). John-Charles Vockler John-Charles Vockler, as he was known to his parents; His Grace Archbishop John-Charles, as he was to the Anglican Catholic Church, Brother John-Charles, as he…

Papal Claims

The following e-mail exchange from 2012 may be worth preserving.  My interlocutor is a former parishioner who, after leaving Georgia, became a Roman Catholic.  I have removed his name for privacy's sake.  He is not a theologian, and I do not mean to suggest that there are not stronger possible arguments for modern papal claims. …

What does ‘Pro-Life’ mean?

To be ‘pro-life’ requires, I believe, acceptance of one basic moral assertion:  It is always wrong to will directly the death of an innocent human being.  This assertion might more precisely be called ‘pro-human life’, since there are non-human living beings, but that refinement is not generally made and suggests another issue for another occasion.…